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Teachers Share What Scares Them Most About Having Kids of Their Own


Teachers Share What Scares Them Most About Having Kids of Their Own

Contemplating becoming a teacher and parent at the same time is absolutely terrifying. Yes, deciding to become a parent is always huge, but when you’re a teacher, you have some insider knowledge into how kids work. There are lots of great parts to look forward to, for sure. Watching them learn and grow. Seeing them beam with pride in themselves as they reach new milestones. Singing along to GoNoodle without shame. Stealing their fruit snacks. The hugs (even if they’re often mysteriously sticky).

But being a teacher and parent is also super scary! Here are some of the concerns about juggling both.

1. All names have been tainted.

How can we possibly pick a name for a baby that isn’t linked to memories of a student – past or present? It doesn’t matter if we had positive or negative experiences with that student, it’s best to give a child a clean slate with a name all their own. But when you’ve been teaching a while the pickings are slim. 

2. There isn’t enough coffee for teacher + parent tired

We don’t get enough sleep now. How can we possibly handle being up all night taking care of a colicky baby, teething toddler, vomiting kid, or out-past-curfew-teenager? How do people who are teachers and parents function? It doesn’t seem possible to guzzle enough coffee to get through the day.

3. We can’t be “that” parent

Teachers have dealt with all sorts of parents. There’s a fear about becoming “that parent” – the one all the teachers dread. We can vow, “that will never be me” all day long, but they probably said the same thing!

4. We’ll never get their name right on the first try

Remember when your mom was frazzled and called out the names of all your siblings and pets before finally remembering your name? What if we do that to our child, but go through all of our student’s names? It will pretty much take all day just to say “breakfast is ready”!

5. We already get crapped on every day

Do we really want to voluntarily take on piles of poopy diapers after the exhaustion of teaching all day? Doesn’t teacher life mean we’re figuratively pooped on all too often? Why make it literal?

6. We know what we’re getting into

Let’s face it – even when potty-trained, kids are gross. Do we really want to dodge boogers, BO, and mysteriously wet shoestrings all day only to be hit with it as soon as we get home?

7. We’ll never get to use the bathroom in peace anywhere, ever again.

Teachers have notoriously little time for bathroom breaks. We often revel in taking all the time we want when we’re home. But if you’re a teacher and parent, your bathroom time is never relaxing. You have to hold it until you nearly explode at school and then pee in front of an audience of little humans at home. 

8. We don’t want to go through homework hell

Our students think we’re smart – experts at whatever we teach. We like that. But a high school Spanish teacher isn’t necessarily a good match for 6th-grade math. How embarrassing to be a teacher who struggles with their own third-grader’s homework! 

9. They’ll forever be labeled a teacher’s kid

Do we really want to sentence our offspring to life as a teacher kid? Are lamination fumes dangerous for infants? And there’s no possibility of a pony on a teacher’s salary

10. They’ll spill all the tea  

Teachers take pride in tiny little white lies, such as convincing students we’re mermaids. But our own kids will know our secrets. And the little snitches will probably out us to other kids. There goes our guilty pleasure fun.

11. Getting a sub is nearly impossible without factoring in maternity leave and sick kids at home

Finding a sub is a nightmare and writing sub plans is a huge undertaking. Thinking of creating long-term sub plans for maternity leave and then finding subs every time the little bundle of joy is sick at home may induce a panic attack. 

12. Mixing “teacher brain” with “parent brain”

You’ve heard of “mom brain.” Everything is consumed by thoughts of caring for a new baby combined with exhaustion. “Teacher brain” is a thing, too. So what if we accidentally mix backpacks and end up with a bag full of diapers at school and the babysitter gets a stinky baby with stacks of ungraded math tests?

13. Our precious Saturday and Sunday mornings of sleeping in will be history

Weekends are childless teachers time to recharge! Sleeping in until noon, silence in the house, bingeing complete series in a single day…that’s a lot to give up!

14. Are we ready for all that karma?

Let’s be honest, childless teachers do a whole lot of judging of other people’s parenting. Can we handle the karma of that coming back at us?

To those of you who made the leap to be a teacher and a parent, thanks for taking the leap so the rest of us can study you. We love seeing and hearing about your cute kiddos! Watching you juggle it all makes us thing just maybe we can, too. 

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Teachers Share What Scares Them Most About Having Kids of Their Own

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Rachael Moshman
Rachael Moshman, M.Ed., an editor at Bored Teachers, is a mom, educator, writer, and advocate for self-confidence. She's been a teacher in classrooms of infants through adult college students. She loves pizza, Netflix and yoga. Connect with her at [email protected]
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